BOSTON (WWLP) – A repeat convicted felon from Brockton has been charged with firearm and drug offenses.

Christian Soares, otherwise known as “Eazy,” 29, of Brockton, was formally accused on two counts of being a felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition, as well as one count of possessing with intent to distribute cocaine, fentanyl, and buprenorphine (suboxone), one count of possessing with intent to distribute cocaine, methamphetamine, MDA and 40 grams or more of fentanyl, and two counts of possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking offense, according to the Department of Justice.

Soares had a loaded firearm on him while a convicted felon did so in furtherance of a drug traffickings offense, such as possessing cocaine, fentanyl, and buprenorphine (suboxone) that was intended for distribution, according to the indictment in 2019. In 2021, it is alleged that Soares had multiple firearms and ammunition while a convicted felon did so in furtherance of a drug trafficking offense. It is also alleged that Soares did so while also possessing cocaine, methamphetamine, MDA, and 40 grams or more of fentanyl that was intended for distribution.

The charge of the possession with intent to distribute cocaine, fentanyl, and buprenorphine, is a sentence of not more than 20 years, but at least three years of supervised release, and a fine of up to $5,000,000. The charge of possession with intent to distribute 40 grams or more of fentanyl provides for a sentence of at least five years and up to 40 years in prison, at least four years and up to a lifetime of supervised release, and a fine of up to $5 million. The charge of being a felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition is a sentence of up to 10 years in prison, three years of supervised release, as well as a fine of $250,000. The charge of possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug offense provides for a sentence of at least five years and up to life in prison, and to be served from and after the term of imprisonment imposed for any other count, supervised release of up to five years, as well as a fine of up to $250,000.

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), which is a program that brings together all levels of law enforcement and communities that they serve to reduce violent crime and gun violence and to make neighborhoods safer for everyone. This is also part of an Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Forces (OCDETF) operation, which identifies, disrupts, and dismantles the highest-level criminal organizations that threaten the United States using a prosecutor-led and multi-agency approach.