BOSTON, Mass. (WWLP)– A federal judge in Boston has sentenced two former eBay executives to prison for their involvement in a cyberstalking and harassment scheme.

According to prosecutors, both men and several other co-conspirators worked together to target a husband and wife in Natick, Massachusetts who published a newsletter that reported on issues of interest to eBay sellers. The eBay employees objected to some of the articles in the newsletter and comments by readers.

The victims received anonymous packages containing items such as a book on surviving the death of a spouse, a bloody pig mask, a fetal pig, a funeral wreath and live insects. An ad was placed on Craig’s list offering sexual encounters with the couple that included publishing their home address.

The scheme was revealed in August 2019, when Baugh, Harville and a co-conspirator traveled from California to Natick to surveil the victims and install a GPS tracking device on the victims’ car. The victims spotted the surveillance team and contacted local police. Harville also purchased tools intending to break into the victims’ garage and lied to an eBay investigator who was responding to the Natick Police’s request for assistance.

On April 25, 2022, James Baugh, 47, of San Jose, California pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit stalking through interstate travel and through facilities of interstate commerce, two counts of stalking through interstate travel, two counts of stalking through facilities of interstate commerce, two counts of witness tampering and two counts of destruction, alteration and falsification of records in a federal investigation. He was sentenced to 57 months in prison and two years of supervised release and was also ordered to pay a fine of $40,000.

On May 12, 2022, David Harville, 50, of Las Vegas, Nevada, pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit stalking through interstate travel and through facilities of interstate commerce, two counts of stalking through interstate travel and two counts of stalking through facilities of interstate commerce. He was sentenced to two years in prison and two years of supervised release and ordered to pay a fine of $20,000.