Protecting your eyes from the dangers of snow blindness

Health

A bright, sunny day after a winter storm sounds nice, but there may be a health risk that comes with it. 

A cloudless day means plenty of sunlight reflected off of the white, wintry landscape.

It makes for a pretty sight, but you won’t want to forget sunglasses if you’re spending extended amounts of time outside on the snow. That’s to prevent ultraviolet damage to your eyes from the sunlight reflecting off of the white snow.

Essentially, the light burns the front surface of your eye, known as the cornea. You might feel pain, see redness on the whites of your eyes, and have hazy vision. But the effects should be temporary. 

“I have the glasses that tint accordingly and mine I’ve been noticing are getting really really dark and so I know that it’s because how brilliant the sun is and the reflection against the snow,” said Earl Watt of Chicopee.

In a mild case, you can treat it with artificial tears, and time. 

But if your snow blindness isn’t temporary, it’s important to go see an eye doctor. 

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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