BOSTON, Mass. (WWLP)–The new year means new pay raises for the state’s top officials and lawmakers.

Constitutional officers will likely receive 20% more than in their 2022 salaries while legislators are in line to receive their fourth pay raise since 2017.

Under the state constitution, changes to base pay for lawmakers are required every two years to coincide with changes to median household income. According to a letter Governor Charlie Baker sent to Treasurer Deb Goldberg last week, the median household income in the state has grown by 4.42 percent over the past two years. Meaning, an over 4% pay increase for next session. This would raise base pay by $3,118 dollars a year.

“If our state’s politicians can afford to give themselves a pay raise after Question 1’s tax hike goes into effect, then they should also provide ‘broad tax cuts’ and ‘tax eliminations’ for everyone else as a way to deal with the economic fallout associated with the passage of Question 1.”

Massachusetts Fiscal Alliance

The governor, lieutenant governor, attorney general, auditor, treasurer and secretary of state are in line for a 20% pay increase due to a law that passed in 2017. This means that Governor-Elect Healey will earn a $222,185 dollar salary and a standard $65,000 dollar housing allowance in 2023.

Yesterday, Question 1, or the “millionaires tax” went into effect and Massachusetts Fiscal Alliance is critical of lawmakers pay raises with more taxes being put in place for residents. They said in a statement: “If our state’s politicians can afford to give themselves a pay raise after Question 1’s tax hike goes into effect, then they should also provide ‘broad tax cuts’ and ‘tax eliminations’ for everyone else as a way to deal with the economic fallout associated with the passage of Question 1.”

The Speaker of the House and Senate President are also in line for a bump in their salaries from $178,473 dollars to more than $214,000 dollars if they are both re-elected to lead.

In years past, some lawmakers have rejected their pay increase, and others have donated theirs to charity. However, the majority of lawmakers have accepted the raises