It’s almost spring! Are you ready for your allergies to kick in?

Weather News

For the first time in 2019, pollen is above low levels in Springfield. The pollen count reached medium-high Monday, followed by medium levels Tuesday, for juniper, a type of tree in the cypress family. 

Even though the ground is still snow-covered across western Massachusetts, that’s not preventing pollen levels from rising. There’s no ragweed or grass pollen out yet, which cause most of our issues, but you don’t need plentiful green and blooming flowers to see a pollen increase.

This time of year, allergens in juniper pollen blow in from other parts of the country.

Juniper pollen grains spread easily because they’re so small and easily airborne. 

“I’m not affected but my kids and a lot of my coworkers are,” Lena Perez from Chicopee told 22News. “And the minute the snow go away, they can’t breathe, they can’t–they can’t see, their eyes are all inflamed.”

“They sneeze, they’re blowing their nose all the time. You know, allergies,” Barry Roberts from Chicopee explained about his children.

Most of us won’t start feeling the effects of the more common types of tree pollen until the end of March or early April when temperatures really start warming up. First comes tree pollen, then its grass pollen, which comes a little later, from May into July. 

If you want to get ahead of the sniffling and sneezing, it might be a good idea to talk to your doctor now.

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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