Tips and tricks for driving on ice and treating your home

Weather News

It seems like we went from a hot summer right into very cold conditions and it could be cold enough for ice toward the end of this week. 

Ice is a part of living in New England. So you’ll want to reduce the slip and slide factor on your walkway or driveway with rock salt or calcium chloride. If you have pets, check the label for a pet-safe treatment. Rocky’s Ace Hardware recommends the calcium chloride for best results. 

“Calcium Chloride — it’s a better product. So it melts — has a better melting rate…So it won’t harm your concrete and stuff,” Matthew Robidoux told 22News. “Whereas the rock salt, it has a lower melting rate so it will damage your concrete and eat it up.”

In anticipation of ice, you can treat ahead of time, but Robidoux said the best practice is to wait until the ice is actually there, and reapply it as needed. Ice melt works almost instantly.

But no matter how much ice melt you put on your walkway or driveway, you still have to get out on those roads. Now no matter what type of car or truck you drive or what tires you have, the best advice for driving on ice is to take it slow and give yourself extra distance.

Snow tires give you better traction in snow, and snow tires with studs will improve your grip on icy roads.

In one study, cars equipped with snow tires stopped 48-percent faster on ice than cars with all-season tires.

Copyright 2019 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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